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* [[Booth babes]] may be criticised for their sexually attractive dress/appearance
 
* [[Booth babes]] may be criticised for their sexually attractive dress/appearance
 
* During the [[Geek feminist harassment at OSCON]] incident, Nice Girl reported that she and a friend had been told they were dressing too sexily, contributing to a [[Sexualized environment]]
 
* During the [[Geek feminist harassment at OSCON]] incident, Nice Girl reported that she and a friend had been told they were dressing too sexily, contributing to a [[Sexualized environment]]
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* The tendency to denounce attractive women as [[fake geek girls]]
   
 
== Why it's a problem ==
 
== Why it's a problem ==

Revision as of 08:32, 15 August 2012

Slut shaming is the act of criticising a woman for her real or presumed sexual activity, or for behaving in ways that someone thinks are associated with her real or presumed sexual activity.

Examples

Why it's a problem

Women's sex lives and sexuality are matters of their own choice, and nobody else's business.

Criticisms of women's supposedly too-sexual appearance are often used to control women. Such criticisms are also frequently used to blame women for rape. See also: Rape culture.

In geek circles, there is often a tension between women's own sexual expression or choices in dress/grooming, and between Sexualized environments, which can be unwelcoming for some women. One important point to consider is who is served by (eg.) the women in skimpy clothes? If the women are doing it for themselves (as in the case of cosplay, for example) it is very different from if a company has hired women to dress sexily to attract male customers. In the latter case, it's important to not slut-shame the women who were working, but to criticise the attitudes and actions of the company that hired them.

It is sometimes argued that although women can freely choose to dress/act sexily, those choices aren't made in a vacuum, and may be the result of broader sexist norms. This is true; and yet the criticism in these cases should be aimed at the sexist norms, which are the actual problem. See also: Choice.

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